Q&A: Evil Twin

New York-based Danish gypsy brewer Jeppe Jarnit-Bjergso talks food matching, unmissable US breweries and what's next

What do you think sets Evil Twin apart from other breweries? 

Well first of all the fact that we donít own a brewery (yet), but are so-called gypsy brewers, meaning we rent space from other breweries to make our beers. It means we can do what we want and not have to be concerned with paying rent and such. We can make a beer one time, if it sells we do it again, if not we can move on to the next.

 

How do you see Evil Twin developing? 

We are in the process of building a brewery

Q&A: Evil Twin

New York-based Danish gypsy brewer Jeppe Jarnit-Bjergso talks food matching, unmissable US breweries and what's next

What do you think sets Evil Twin apart from other breweries? 

Well first of all the fact that we donít own a brewery (yet), but are so-called gypsy brewers, meaning we rent space from other breweries to make our beers. It means we can do what we want and not have to be concerned with paying rent and such. We can make a beer one time, if it sells we do it again, if not we can move on to the next.

 

How do you see Evil Twin developing? 

We are in the process of building a brewery in New York. We will still gypsy brew but we want to establish Evil Twin as a real New York brand so this is needed. Other than that we are pretty much only focused on getting better at what we do.

 

What was the ethos you first set out with? 

To be the best at what we do and to only brew beer we like to drink ourselves, meaning never do anything to please. We believe thatís the only way you can stand 100 per cent behind what you do.

 

How do you see the beer scene developing in the next few years? 

As it has the last five with new breweries opening and the big guys getting bigger.

 

As your new book with Daniel Burns suggests, beer can easily be as elevated as wine in restaurants ñ what mindset needs to change before this can happen? 

Good question. Beer is historically seen as the poor manís drink so that needs to change. During the last 10-20 years, the craft beer evolution has given us new styles, barrel-ageing, wild yeast  and more. All things that we get inspiration from the wine world.

 

Any top tips for new breweries? 

There are so many new good ones popping up. A brewery like Trillium Brewing Company in Boston is killing it right now with good reason, and my friend Coryís side project in St. Louis is now a bricks and mortar brewery so that is very exciting! 

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