Different beers like to be treated in different ways. Here’s our handy guide for how to pour beer and get the best out of each style!

 

 

Ale

Beer Hawk's Guide to Pouring Ale

Tilt your glass and pour gently to stop excessive frothing.

Different beers like to be treated in different ways. Here’s our handy guide for how to pour beer and get the best out of each style!

 

 

Ale

Beer Hawk's Guide to Pouring Ale

Tilt your glass and pour gently to stop excessive frothing.

Beer Hawk's Guide to Pouring Ale

Aim for a head the width of one finger. Control the head by straightening the glass.

Beer Hawk's Guide to Pouring Ale

Don’t make your head too creamy as the hops will sneak in and affect the taste.

 

Stout

Beer Hawk's Guide to Pouring Stout

Be patient, this is a long, slow process: an unhurried pour constrains the growth of the head – so slow down if the head gets over-excited!

Beer Hawk's Guide to Pouring Stout

For a creamier head, pour in two stages.

Beer Hawk's Guide to Pouring Stout

Remember, stout in bottles isn’t going to be quite as creamy as draught (no widgets!).

 

Pilsner

Pouring-Pilsner-Part-1

A real Pilsner must have a blossoming head.

Pouring-Pilsner-Part-2

Bubbly is best and it makes the colour more exciting.

Pouring-Pilsner-Part-3

Pilsner needs a big head and should froth over the top of the glass to give you a better sniff.

 

Wheat Beer

Pouring-Wheat-Beer-Part-1

Be gentle, pour slowly or your froth will be premature.

Pouring-Wheat-Beer-Part-2

Like Pilsner, a great wheat beer is best enjoyed with a big head.

Pouring-Wheat-Beer-Part-3

Yeast is your friend – swill the last bit in the bottle to loosen the yeast. Pour into your glass.